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Skin Cancer


Skin Cancer

Skin Cancer

Skin cancers including erosive ulcers, malignant melanoma, and squamous cell carcinoma often start as changes to your skinSkin cancer can also occur in different areas of your skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight. Skin cancer prevention, early detection, risk factors, and treatment. Educate yourself!


Skin cancer can be divided into the following three types:
1.      Erosive ulcers 
 Born on the face or neck, are the most common skin cancers. The consequences can be severe if left untreated.
2.      Malignant melanoma 
This skin cancer is uncommon and can occur anywhere on the body.
3.      Squamous cell carcinoma 
Also known as epithelial cancer is usually spontaneous. Warts on the hands, head, ears, face, lips, or neck of older people can develop into this type of skin cancer, but it is rare.

1.  Erosive ulcers

Also known as "basal cell carcinomas". Cancer cells grow slowly. They are more common skin cancers, which often occur on the face, neck, nose, eyelids, and ears. This cancer does not spread to other parts of the body and must be removed by surgery. If left untreated, the ulcers will gradually expand and even erode the bones beneath them and be fatal.

Symptom

·         At first, small papules, such as waxy pearls, will appear; after a few months or years, the papules can grow into heart knots and the surface is pale and shiny.
·         Heart knots develop ulcers later, and they will ulcer shortly after.
·         The edges of the ulcer will bulge and glow.
·         Heart knots can gradually expand over months or years and erode surrounding skin.

Causes

Fewer opportunities unknown may be related to long-term by sun exposure, however, even with clothing to cover the site will also have this skin cancer, but dark-skinned people suffer from the disease.

Treatment

·         If you suspect pimples or ulcers may be erosive ulcers, see your doctor as soon as possible.
·         The doctor can remove the ulcer with a curette or by hand, and can also, perform radiation therapy.
·         Which treatment is used depends on the size and location of the ulcer.

Prevention

Wear a cap that protects your face and neck to protect your skin from overexposure.

2.  Malignant melanoma

This cancer will make the skin pigment-containing cells, are relatively rare cases. Generally, malignant melanomas are caused by existing pigmented spots or nodules. Such cancer cells can spread throughout the body in weeks or months. 

The shallower the malignant melanoma invades the skin, the greater the chance of healing. If it has penetrated deep into the skin, cancer cells are likely to have spread to the lymph and blood vessels, often dying within months or years.

Symptom

·         Changes in the color, size, and surrounding skin of nodules or pigmented spots on the epidermis.
·         Epidermal moles have bleeding, stinging, or pain.
·         If the surface of the mole has multiple colors and the edges are uneven, special attention must be paid.
·         Tinted nodules may appear on normal skin and then develop ulcers that spread to surrounding skin tissue.

Cause

Is unknown, but people who live in sunny areas and have white skin are more likely to develop it.

Treatment


·         The doctor will perform surgical removal of the nodule, and the skin and subcutaneous tissue around the nodule will be tested in detail.
·         If the malignant melanoma has not metastasized, the chance of cure is 100%. However, any patient who already has a melanoma is at risk of regenerating the tumor, so patients need regular skin examinations.

Prevention

There is no way to prevent it, but if you suspect that you have melanoma, you should test it as soon as possible and treat it as soon as possible.

3.  Squamous cell carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma is a skin cancer that originates in the middle layer of the epidermis. It usually occurs in areas exposed to sunlight, but it can also grow on any part of the skin or on the tongue and oral mucosa. 

Most squamous cell carcinomas only affect the surrounding skin, but some cancer cells can spread to distant parts of the body and are life-threatening.

Symptom

·         Squamous cells started as a red block with scales and scabs on the surface and could not heal.
·         The lump can grow in weeks or months, causing ulcers, but not necessarily painful.

Cause

·         May be related to aging, but unknown.
·         Long-term exposure to sunlight or exposure to radiation and certain chemicals can also cause skin cancer.

Treatment

·         If a wart develops on the skin and does not disappear or continue to grow for more than a month, or if the lumps grow rapidly and become ulcers or bleeding, you should immediately see a doctor. Doctors can treat with liquid nitrogen freezing or fluorouracil cream, which can kill rapidly dividing cells.
·         The doctor will surgically remove the tumor and test it.

Prevention

Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight, especially people living in hot areas for many years.
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